MONUMENTS AND SIGHTS

The Leo of Piraeus

The Leo of Piraeus

The Leo of Piraeus is one of four lion statues on display at the Venetian Arsenal, where it was displayed as a symbol of Venice's patron saint, Saint Mark. It was originally located in Piraeus, the harbor of Athens. It was looted by Venetian naval commander Francesco Morosini in 1687 as plunder taken in the Great Turkish War against the Ottoman Empire, during which the Venetians captured Athens and Morosini's cannons caused damage to the Parthenon only matched by his subsequent looting. From the imposing presence of the monument, the port was also called Porto Leone.

Archaeological Museum of Piraeus

Archaeological Museum of Piraeus

The Archaeological Museum of Piraeus, Attica, (Greece) contains mainly sculptures, discovered in Piraeus and in the area of the Attic coast from Bronze Age to Roman times. It is located in the area between Terpsithea and Pasalimani.

Parthenon

Parthenon

Parthenon, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people of Athens considered their patron. Construction began in 447 BC when the Athenian Empire was at the peak of its power. It was completed in 438 BC although decoration of the building continued until 432 BC. It is the most important surviving building of Classical Greece, generally considered the zenith of the Doric order. Its decorative sculptures are considered some of the high points of Greek art. The Parthenon is regarded as an enduring symbol of Ancient Greece, Athenian democracy and Western civilization, and one of the world's greatest cultural monuments. Only a very small number of the sculptures remain in situ; most of the surviving sculptures are today (controversially) in the British Museum in London as the Elgin Marbles, but a few pieces are also in the Louvre, and museums in Rome, Vienna and Palermo.

Acropolis Museum

Acropolis Museum

The Acropolis Museum (Greek: Μουσείο Ακρόπολης, Mouseio Akropolis) is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece. It also lies over the ruins of a part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens. The museum was founded in 2003, while the Organization of the Museum was established in 2008. It opened to the public on 20 June 2009.

Herod Atticus Odeon

Herod Atticus Odeon

The Odeon of Herodes Atticus is a stone theatre structure located on the southwest slope of the Acropolis of Athens, Greece. The building was completed in 161 AD and then renovated in 1950. It was built in 161 AD by the Athenian magnate Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla. It was originally a steep-sloped theater with a three-story stone front wall and a wooden roof made of expensive cedar of Lebanon timber. It was used as a venue for music concerts with a capacity of 5,000. It lasted intact until it was destroyed and left in ruins by the Heruli in 267 AD. The audience stands and the orchestra (stage) were restored using pentelic marble in the 1950s. Since then, it has been the main venue of the Athens Festival, which runs from May through October each year, featuring a variety of acclaimed Greek as well as International performances.

Ancient Agora of Athens

Ancient Agora of Athens

The Ancient Agora of Athens is the open space that is located close to the northwest of the Acropolis. In antiquity, it was administrative, philosophical, educational, social, cultural, and especially the financial center of the city. The Ancient Agora was crossed by the Panathenaean Road from which the great procession to the Acropolis passed during the Panathenaic celebrations, established by Peisistratus and was the third year of each Olympiad.